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[Episode #154] – Japan’s Nuclear Dilemma

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Japan was once the third-largest operator of nuclear power facilities in the world, but that came to a sudden end with the largest earthquake to ever hit the country on March 11th 2011, which caused a massive tsunami that led to the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and then to the closure of all 54 of the country’s nuclear plants. In the decade hence, Japan has struggled to plot a new course to get its energy, see-sawing between attempts to restart the plants and relying more on coal and natural gas, while at the same time trying to improve efficiency, conserve energy, and find ways to reduce its emissions to help meet its decarbonization targets under the Paris climate agreement.

Now, the country’s leadership is taking bold steps toward building more renewables and seeking to cut back on its use of fossil fuels, while just a handful of its nuclear plants have been restarted and the future of the rest is very much in contention. It’s a confusing political landscape, and one of the most challenging cases in the world for energy transition, but it also could prove to be one of the most cutting-edge leaders, especially if it can exploit its offshore potential for renewables.

In this episode, Bloomberg reporter Stephen Stapczynski, who has reported on Japan’s energy sector for years, paints for us a coherent picture of Japan’s nuclear past, where it stands now, and how it will obtain its energy in the future.

Guest:

Stephen Stapczynski a Singapore-based energy reporter at Bloomberg News, who covers everything from the North Asian LNG market to Japan’s power policy. Stephen was previously stationed at Bloomberg’s Tokyo bureau, where he closely monitored Japan’s nuclear restarts and the liberalization of the electricity sector.

On Twitter: ‪@SStapczynski

On the Web: Bloomberg.com

Recording date: July 26, 2021

Air date: September 1, 2021

Geek rating: 2

$7
$7

[Episode #154] – Japan’s Nuclear Dilemma

Japan was once the third-largest operator of nuclear power facilities in the world, but that came to a sudden end with the largest earthquake to ever hit the country on March 11th 2011, which caused a massive tsunami that led to the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and then to the closure of all 54 of the country’s nuclear plants. In the decade hence, Japan has struggled to plot a new course to get its energy, see-sawing between attempts to restart the plants and relying more on coal and natural gas, while at the same time trying to improve efficiency, conserve energy, and find ways to reduce its emissions to help meet its decarbonization targets under the Paris climate agreement.

Now, the country’s leadership is taking bold steps toward building more renewables and seeking to cut back on its use of fossil fuels, while just a handful of its nuclear plants have been restarted and the future of the rest is very much in contention. It’s a confusing political landscape, and one of the most challenging cases in the world for energy transition, but it also could prove to be one of the most cutting-edge leaders, especially if it can exploit its offshore potential for renewables.

In this episode, Bloomberg reporter Stephen Stapczynski, who has reported on Japan’s energy sector for years, paints for us a coherent picture of Japan’s nuclear past, where it stands now, and how it will obtain its energy in the future.

Guest:

Stephen Stapczynski a Singapore-based energy reporter at Bloomberg News, who covers everything from the North Asian LNG market to Japan’s power policy. Stephen was previously stationed at Bloomberg’s Tokyo bureau, where he closely monitored Japan’s nuclear restarts and the liberalization of the electricity sector.

On Twitter: ‪@SStapczynski

On the Web: Bloomberg.com

Recording date: July 26, 2021

Air date: September 1, 2021

Geek rating: 2

  • Size
    113 MB
  • Duration
    82 minutes
  • Size113 MB
  • Duration82 minutes
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